Skip to main content

About your Search

English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
-american. maryland did it. >> i'm curious why you think president bill clinton since he has the freedom hillary doesn't, why hasn't he apologized for this stain on his record? >> in 2009 before obama, not a very expansive or hugely heartfelt way, said i'm now for marriage equality. again it was not a big statement. i think he feels like i did that, what more do i have to do. i think doma is such a nasty bit of legislation, codified bigotry, it calls for more robust than that. >> the important divergence that frank is identifying between the two democratic presidents. president obama's justice department did make the unusual step of deciding not to defend the constitutionality of doma, typically the justice department defends everything because it is the lawyer of the laws of the land. here they have the discretion to do otherwise. they did otherwise. it makes a difference. as the lower courts and potentially the supreme court, as they look at this, they look to the political branches and now we have the president of the united states, one of the political branches saying this is not constitutional, i
can tell you, it's not a hard ask, it's a partnership. and actually, as much as bill clinton and newt gingrich loatheds each other at times, they worked together to deal with -- >> on impeachment. >> to deal with republicans like myself on balancing the budget for the first time in a generation, balancing it four years for the first time since the 1920s, paying down the national debt. and you know what? newt gingrich always had to fight us on his right flank, and he and bill clinton sat in the white house and strategized. >> i have a question. >> republican votes for that first clinton budget that set them on the path. >> joe, i've got -- >> hold on. come on, richard. you must have been sleeping or somewhere in britain in '95, '96, '97, '98 and '99 when we balanced the budget for the first time in a generation. >> joe, i have a question for you. let's say boehner goes back to his caucus and says, you know what? from the president's first proposal, i was able to shave off $600 billion in tax hikes. >> right. >> so i saved that. >> by the way, we're going to end up at, like, 1.2, aren't
for the event taking a picture of herself. here she is and secretary hillary clinton. bill clinton along others says said if there's a movie made by hillary clinton meryl streep should get the part. >>> next, secretary who? at a u.n. event to benefit people with disantibiotics, john mccain took on the rumors of who will be the next secretary of state after an introduction from john kerry. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> kerry stepped up again after mccain but refused to bite on that one. >> thank you very much, mr. president. this is what happens when you get two losers up here, folks. >> that was a good line. kerry has been careful to stay clear of the public speculation about whom the president will actually pick to replace hillary clinton. >>> also, ads governor jan brewer, she's a heavyweight, in a comment about global warming. she doesn't think it's man made, but her own explanation for climate change is rather lacking. here is what she told a local reporter. >> everybody has an opinion on it, you know, and i probably don't believe it's manmade. i believe that,
bowles idea. they summarized the testimony that the bill clinton chief of staff last year gave about what he thought might kind of be a workable budget deal way back then. because bowles is a democrat, the republicans thought they he could try to pretend that agreeing with a single democrat means that they are actually willing to compromise big time even though erskine bowles is a very easy democrat to negotiate with, unlike the actual elected democrats in washington. in other words, erskine bowles is willing to compromise on things or was willing to compromise on things that the democrats are not willing to co comp pro mice on. which means that it's utterly meaningless on your way to try to get a deal with the president of the united states. erskine bowles' proposal included a $600 billion cut in medicare spending which he achieved by raising the medicare eligibility age. so republicans just proposed raising the eligibility age for medicare, a proposal that polls show is supported by a full 30% of the american people and rejected by only 67% of them. white house communications director d
of americans for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so the president seems to be moving the goal posts in a deliberate effort, i don't know, to extract something, to push people over the fiscal cliff. something's going on and it's not clear because he's n
. that is a given. i think that will happen. bill clinton tried to find a way to balance it out. he was going to cut a lot of investment rates. that, that profumo was enough to help trigger an economic boom. what you hand out in of a tax increase, the president could give back, that would favor the investment community. it could work for him. lori: grover norquist, tea party two-point oh. neil: it is interesting. it is hard to read whether there will be held back to pay for anyone who votes for any type of a tax increase. i think we have learned from this election, you know, back in the a very suicidal pact. i do not know if that threat is real. what is more real right now, the result we have to get a permit spending under control, has disappeared. when it came to spending, that is still -- by the way, the same people who are picking apart the tea party, john boehner is where he is now and the house enjoys the republican party it does now because of the tea party. i would not be so quick to dismiss all. connell: you still think we are all just playing around it we will get a deal done? neil: i would
. >> stephanie: gee, who was really front and center of our campaign? bill clinton! kind of weird. >> good president. >> stephanie: mary in pennsylvania. hi mary. >> caller: hi, there. i love your show. didn't start watching it until late in the campaign. and i feel like i found a wonderful friend. >> stephanie: aww. >> caller: my question is grover cleveland -- >> stephanie: his ideas are just as fresh. [ laughter ] >> caller: exactly. if he think the average career only lasts 25 years has he signed up all of those people to the pledge 20 years ago shouldn't we be getting ready to throw him a retirement party pretty soon? >> stephanie: yeah, one would think. a lot of people were saying it applied to the congress that they signed it for and that was 20 years ago. don in columbus. hi don welcome. >> caller: hi, steph, how are you? >> stephanie: good. go ahead. >> caller: i was curious. i watched the shows yesterday and it was noticeable that tim kind of explained himself to everybody including chris wa
. >> real quick, who's the republican bill clinton in this case? >> who could argument? i don't know. who is that? maybe michael steele. >> you see where that got me. >> is there a senior statesman in the republican party who could go to the republican right and bring them over? is there one? >> reporter: tom coburn. >> kelly, go ahead. yeah. >> reporter: i would say tom coburn of oklahoma who has a lot of credibility on these conservative issues. bob corker of tennessee is a voice who has been trying to make a bigger imprint. and one of the things to factor into the unity you're seeing with the republican leadership which does feel different this time around is while boehner has been selected by his fellow republicans to be the leader of their conference as speaker, he must be elected in the new congress in january. so he's got something on the line here, too. there's a lot of confidence about the future of his speakership, but it isn't official yet. and so he's got to play this very carefully from just the perspective of holding on to the gavel. >> kelly o'donnell, thanks very much for
the budget of the united states when he was chief of staff for bill clinton. he knows the game. he is a master negotiator. >> you are wearing me out. [laughter] >> i am older than you. it is a great privilege. what i am fascinated by, when this report came out, it was deafening. what are these guys doing? they are talking about revenues, spending cuts, and we sat in that room for seven months, and we come out with five democrats and five republicans and one independent, and if you do not think that is tough to get a range like that, you do not know anything about meetings or conferences or commissions. that is what we have got. across the street was the national association of realtors. i live with a realtor. she is not doing that anymore. she was a good lobbyist. she was tremendous. they just chuckled. home mortgage interest deduction? you guys are stupid. you will get rid of us. we do not get rid of it. take it from $1 million to $500,000. give everyone else a 12% non refundable tax credit. helps the little guy that everybody talks about. everything we did is set this, get rid of
deficits through all those years. it was only on the partnership of newt gingrich and bill clinton, and i might also add, some of the most aggressive spending reductions that we've seen in my lifetime, that we were able to create budget surpluses if you include the social security trust fund. there was a sleight of hand going on as we look at this chart, not what's going on in the cash flow budget. there was a cash flow for four years. then the tech bubble bursts. 9/11 happens. and we get into these bush years where you see some of the largest deficits in american history during the bush years. response to 9/11, response to the war in iraq and afghanistan , some of the largest budget deficits in american history on our republican president's watch, on a republican congress' watch in response to some tremendous crises but largest deficits in history. frightening deficits. and mr. speaker, those deficits are barely noticeable compared to where we are today. largest budget deficits in american history during the bush years. deficits so large they were threatening our economy and president bu
it to passage, the bill would be send to the white house and then put into law. obama has been unequivocal over the fact that the top earners tax rate must return to the clinton era. he can introduce a tax plan that will accomplish all of his revenue goals. that's the rumbling that they are getting ready to cave and make it seem like they are not caving. the republicans are suddenly in control, blah, blah, blah blah blah. so i don't -- i'm getting confused on how the best way is for this to play out. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: you know president bad for business, jim? corporate profits have hit a record high while wages have hit a record low. corporation earnings are up 18.6% from a year ago. >> thanks to that socialist obama. >> stephanie: wages as a percentage of the economy are at an all-time low as this chart shows. i have a handy dandy chart once again. >> socialist, communist, hip hop barbecue. >> stephanie: thank you, skeeter. let's goo to jerry. >> caller: hey, steph. i was wondering during the fiscal cliff thing they are talking about put
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)